Saturday, September 15, 2007

Wood

The forest floor, littered with stones and rocks, twigs and branches, leaves and bark, in varying shades of brown and gray, blushed with tints of blue, purple and pink, crunched under foot. A touch of mossy green outlined areas of interest. The path was well-defined with use. Traversed by humans and animals alike, years of walking and trotting created a smooth surface for future travelers and a map to the best spots in the woods.

Along each side of the path, bright green fern and tufted grasses created a hedge outlining the path and a barrier between the walkway and the trees beyond.

Only the trunks nearest the path were distinguishable. Past the first few trees the forest became dark and flat, hinting at the deep distance in which the trees lived.

The woods spoke in whispers, gossiping about travelers that passed through their domain. They laughed at the naiveté of beings that only lived a few short years.

27 comments:

  1. I loved getting a different perspective. Here we laugh at the short lives of bugs, but trees do live longer lives than we do.

    You're a good writer. :)

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  2. Quilly: The deep woods are one of my favorite places.

    Shari: If we leave them alone, anyway. Thanks.

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  3. Beautifully described.I love nature and anything to do with nature.This descrption reminds me of the dark forests in Wayanad, kerala,India.

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  4. G'day from Australia, Nessa,

    Really enjoyed your comment on my `Telling Write From Wrong' post.

    Will be linking to you on my next ppost in a few hours' time.

    Do keep in touch

    Cheers

    David

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  5. PS: I looked up Wayanad (the internet is amazing.) Wayanad looks very fascinating. I'm glad you enjoyed.

    David: I look forward to reading your site. You have alot of information and encouragement there. Thanks.

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  6. That is a nice passage of writing! Thanks for sharing it with us.

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  7. That so describes my hike last week at Fallen Leaf Lake. Those words are in my vocabulary. Why can't I weave them into a beautiful tapestry as you?
    Happy Birthday to your baby.

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  8. Such a happy visual with those words. Now I'm going to go ruin it by going to work tomorrow. I hate when that happens.

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  9. Good stuff.

    It's true we live only a few short years, but we get around a lot. Trees can't say that. Okay, they can't say anything. But I like'm anyway.

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  10. I really like your desription of the deep forest. This is great writing - you are very lucky to be so talented. Someday we'll say that we 'knew her when'!

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  11. Lovely description and a great ending.

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  12. If they keep laughing us short lived creatures will cut a few of them down, for their own good.

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  13. Nice little writing... did you just jot that off at lunch :)?

    I love envisioning the deep woods, and I love treess. It reminds me of the Ents.

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  14. nessa, I love your writign voice. I bet your real voice is enchantment as well. You descrive with such precision that pictures form so easily in my mind.

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  15. I like this a lot. Loved the last sentence....it's so true.

    woods are places of fascination for so many of us - I grew up reading Enid Blyton books about the enchanted woods and so I never look at them in the same way.
    There are always fairies hiding under the leaves, the branches are always whispering....

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  16. If I'm ever in a wood with wifey, I always speak to her in whispers (when I can get a word in edgeways that is). It's just my way of letting the woods know, I know they're talking about me.

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  17. When I pass through, the woods scream in terror. Especially if I have recently eaten a burrito.

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  18. Very nice - I suddenly feel serene. And Happy Birthday to your baby :)

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  19. Nice piece! Enjoyed the last paragraph of trees whispering of us.

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  20. That's some great descriptive writing.

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  21. There is a lot of John Keatsian inspiration in this post. Fabulous work.

    Will answer your query in my post on `Telling Write From Wrong' later today (Aussie time) .....

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  22. Kevin: Thank you for your kind words and for visiting here.

    Swampy: You are so sweet. Thanks.

    Mr. Fab: Thank you, Mister.

    DaBich: Yum!

    VE: Woods, good; work, bad.

    TLP: They’re talking up a storm, just in a different language.

    Princess Jackie: You can be my horticulturist; D

    Mo’a: Thanks happy Amma.

    Dr. John: I thought you were a man of peace ; )

    Tsduff: This was a note I wrote to myself on my NEO the last time I was in the PA mountains. I love Ents.

    Minka: You are very sweet I’m glad you could see it too.

    Betty Boob Hug: I would tell you that I actually hear the trees and see fairies but then the men would white coats would come to take me away.

    Bazza: Always wise to be careful around trees, especially Elms.

    Sir Grundir: I can believe that; D

    G: I am glad I could add some serenity to your life. Thanks.

    Pauline: Thank you.

    The Phoenix: Thank you oh illuminated one.

    David: Wow, thanks. I am coming back to your site soon. You are a very prolific blogger and I find your posts very interesting.

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  23. Great writing. I especially love the last paragraph.

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